Tag Archives: photo paintings

“Salång PåGång” – “Goings On” – in my home studio on Cultural Night 2016

Or “Salång PåGång” in Swedish is what I always do at the Cultural Night in Lund, every year on the third Saturday of September.

That’s the day and night of the year when all the inhabitants are on their feet to consume cultural events – and culture is defined extremely broadly, including for all ages, all nationalities and all cultural expressions such as eating…

Since I have to take care of my visitors to my studio, I have not experienced the incredible diversity people tell me about – but I remember it faintly from before I opened my studio space in 2009. It was so exciting – dance, poetry, art, music, performances, happenings, you name it!

Salon “Goings On” literally means that I show what I am working on these days; that evening I have no theme-based exhibition but all kinds of works on the walls, including unfinished ones, experiments, big and small prints, test prints and – well, whatever I am working on these weeks and months.

It’s a peep into my studio and working methods with a lot of “A.P.” – Artist’s Proofs, testprints rather than final limited editions.

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peaceandphotoroom1

 

Abstract

This year my visitors will see a couple of A1-sized prints (roughly 90 x 60 cm) – I print everything myself and this is the largest I can do on my printer – of my abstract works; the size means that the incredibly small details will be more visible than the smaller prints I have had on display earlier.

myrothko13_18x18cm_contrast
I’ve written about abstract photography here and there is a video from the exhibition “Abstract Real” here.

 

The Rouen Cathedral – Monet, Lichtenstein and me

Next, there will also be Continue reading

The Rouen Cathedral Suite

It’s all about seeing, isn’t it?

Having lived with art since I was a child, I’ve always played with the idea of doing photography with reference to the art I cherish. Since 1969, I have looked at Roy Lichtenstein’s 6-piece Cathedral Series from that year which were based on Claude Monet’s Rouen Cathedral paintings in the 1890s.

This is about my latest edition, the Rouen Cathedral Suite #1-10.

Gemini GEL, one of the finest graphic printing houses in the world, printed them. They look like screens, newspaper-like and “pop” where the Cathedral image – with the colours expressing the light as it changes over a day – was hidden under (or in) tons of small round holes.

One has to see them at a 3-4 meters distance to at all see anything but dots. And they were faily big, 122 cm high.

Here is one of them.

And who would not love to have owned one of Claude Monet’s originals? Like this one?

Claude Monet, Rouen Cathedral 1895

Claude Monet, Rouen Cathedral 1895

So why do I find this fun, interesting and challenging?

I believe that art is as much about seeing as about what you see. Here is an entrance to a cathedral which, thanks to one of art history’s greatest, has become immortalized. I have always loved Roy Lichtenstein’s series, his truly innovative idea, his re-working of classical art and his ways of making us see – as he also does in, say, the Bull Series and Monet’s Haystacks.

In a way he applied filters and reproduced/re-created great pieces adapted to contemporary printing techniques. I stole the basic idea and asked myself: What if I do the same using Photoshop?

So I took down a photo of one of Monet’s original paintings from the Internet and began to play with it. I played with shapes, filters, light, contrast, saturation, colouration/tones, contrasts, sharpening/blurring and I changed things here and there, pixel by pixel so to say. There were many many more than the 10 I finally selected.

You may think it looks like just some haphazard re-production. It isn’t. It’s a carefully processed experimenting with literally hundreds of variables in each of the suite’s ten pieces.

Here is how they appear on the wall in my studio at the time of writing:

In the studio - The Rouen Cathedral Suite # 1-10 @ 2015

In the studio – The Rouen Cathedral Suite # 1-10   @ 2015

To the left you see one of the original Lichtenstein and then my A2 format prints on fine art Canson Edition Etching Rag papers. Lichtenstein cropped the original portal, my picture is a based on the full image of the portal that Monet painted.

I guess that Continue reading

Art Basel 2014 (5) Photography and painting dialogue…

 

Joel Meyerowitz's photo of Cézanne's studio

Joel Meyerowitz’s photo of Cézanne’s studio

You may have guessed that I am looking for art photography in particular here in Basel? You are right! And I am happy to report that there is so much of it; photography is as accepted as an art form as, say, painting, film, sculpture, prints and multiples. Secondly, there are interesting “dialogues” between photo and painting.

Gerhard Richter – whose exhibition at the Beyeler Foundation outside Basel I shall return to – comes to mind. Many of his paintings appear as photography (until you get closer). But there are also many other examples of how the two art forms speak with each other.

One such example is Joel Meyerowitz and here in Basel he shows a kind of photo narrative at the Howard Greenberg Gallery in New York. A couple of years ago he visited Paul Cézanne’s (1839-1906) studio in Aix-en-Provence. He managed to get the permission to take pictures there and was drawn to the grey colours of the studio in which various of Cézanne’s objects and belongings were exhibited.

Next he took pictures of these objects – as if de-coding Cézanne’s paintings and seeing each object in them as a piece of art, a motif for another sort of painting – created with his camera.

Cézanne's studioexhibit  to the left and the single objects in it to the right. By Joel Meyerowitz.

Cézanne’s studio exhibit to the left and the single objects in it to the right. Photographed by Joel Meyerowitz.

I found that interesting, explorative and brilliantly beautiful. Could be done with many other artists – illustrating both time and space in the art and how high quality work may always be seen in its company and add something new. Continue reading