Tag Archives: Iranian calligraphy

Shoot # 55 – Newsletter from Oberg PhotoGraphics

Lund, September 4, 2016
Click on images for info, links or prices 

VeniceRedMorning_CP

Venice Morning 2012 © Jan Oberg

Content  

• Venice: Can it be saved? • Iran • Abstract photography • Victoria & Albert Museum • Landskrona Photo Festival • Instagram • Cultural Night in Lund, Sweden:

Jan Oberg – Oberg PhotoGraphics – Click

Dear art photography friend

Shall Venice die?

It’s been known for quite some time that Venice in Italy is sinking and being destroyed also by over-tourism: 20 million per year in a city of 56,000 inhabitants whose number has fallen dramatically the last few years.

Many of you may have visited Venezia. Can you imagine it dead? I can’t, but it is a realistic scenario and I’ve written a bit about this tragedy on my art blog inspired by art historian Salvatore Settis’ recent wake-up call in the International New York Times and his new book, If Venice Dies.

I forward modest ideas about what can perhaps be done to stop this slow death, world attention to it being one.

But where is the EU in this? Where is the world beyond the market and profit-making? Venice is about a world heritage, not just Venice or Europe.

The photo above is from that unique city, shot at the best time of the year there, in early January when there are almost no tourists.


Anonymous in Venice © Jan Oberg 2015 – Click

Welcome to shoot # 55
It’s a digital gift and will appear only here and on my homepage, a moment of joy or reflection to you from Oberg PhotoGraphics.

A special welcome to many new subscribers and social media friends. Here is the

Continue reading

Video “Abstract Real”

This video offers glimpses of the works I exhibited in my studio in 2016 – an exploration of abstract photography: What is real? What is abstract? And how do the two mix…blur?

All the works started out with a photography and successively changed in the process to become “abstract”.

I find that fascinating since photography has almost always been about taking pictures of what is, i.e. documentary. (Of course with the exception of those few who experimented with “photograms” à la Moholy-Nagy and other techniques that departed from the urge to present a documentation of a recognizable reality).

Observe please the inspiration from Iranian aesthetics, including classical geometric patterns and calligraphy, and enjoy the music I’ve chosen by Iranian composer Fariborz Lachini too.

I’ve written about the background of this exploration at Oberg PhotoGraphic’s blog. And as usual the video is uploaded to my channels on Vimeo and Youtube.

Abstract Real

Here’s a background to my exhibition that will open at Easter 2016, Friday the 25th of March  – “Abstract Real”.

Google “abstract art” and you get this definition by Rudolph Arnheim:

“Abstract art uses a visual language of shape, form, colour and line to create a composition which may exist with a degree of independence from visual references in the world.”

It’s often called nonfigurative and “Abstraction indicates a departure from reality in depiction of imagery in art. This departure from accurate representation can be slight, partial, or complete. Abstraction exists along a continuum.”

Further down this excellent Wikipedia entry you read that “Much of the art of earlier cultures – signs and marks on pottery, textiles, and inscriptions and paintings on rock – were simple, geometric and linear forms which might have had a symbolic or decorative purpose.

It is at this level of visual meaning that abstract art communicates. One can enjoy the beauty of Chinese calligraphy or Islamic calligraphy without being able to read it.”

Eutopia_7_PhSh

Untitled So Far # 1 © Jan Oberg 2016

Exactly – that’s what I wanted to say too – abstract is a continuum away from re-presentation of the world; it’s about beauty and decoration with no message – except perhaps beauty. It is nothing new and it can depict a reality – but a reality that we don’t “read” concretely and in a broader sense.

So, what about abstraction and photography? Continue reading