Tag Archives: digitalisation

Abstract Real

Here’s a background to my exhibition that will open at Easter 2016, Friday the 25th of March  – “Abstract Real”.

Google “abstract art” and you get this definition by Rudolph Arnheim:

“Abstract art uses a visual language of shape, form, colour and line to create a composition which may exist with a degree of independence from visual references in the world.”

It’s often called nonfigurative and “Abstraction indicates a departure from reality in depiction of imagery in art. This departure from accurate representation can be slight, partial, or complete. Abstraction exists along a continuum.”

Further down this excellent Wikipedia entry you read that “Much of the art of earlier cultures – signs and marks on pottery, textiles, and inscriptions and paintings on rock – were simple, geometric and linear forms which might have had a symbolic or decorative purpose.

It is at this level of visual meaning that abstract art communicates. One can enjoy the beauty of Chinese calligraphy or Islamic calligraphy without being able to read it.”

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Untitled So Far # 1 © Jan Oberg 2016

Exactly – that’s what I wanted to say too – abstract is a continuum away from re-presentation of the world; it’s about beauty and decoration with no message – except perhaps beauty. It is nothing new and it can depict a reality – but a reality that we don’t “read” concretely and in a broader sense.

So, what about abstraction and photography? Continue reading

Shoot # 45

Abstract_#9D_PhSh

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Lund, February 21, 2016
Click on any picture to enlarge and get all info and prices of various editions.

Dear friends

Welcome to shoot # 45

Yes, this is a photograph – Abstract # 9D, 2015 – and it’s a digital gift from Oberg Photographics – a moment of meditation with which I wish you a good Sunday and ‘weekbegin’.
A special welcome to new subscribers and friends on social media. Here is the preceding shoot and In Memoriam for my friend and mentor Viggo Rivad.

It’s a Photolution
“No other art form is going through so big and fast changes as is photography. We are witnesses to a photographic revolution, a “photolution”.
In this article I give you an overview of its elements, compare with other art trends and outline what this super-dynamic development might mean for the future.

Special collection
This new “Special Collection” has been created with connoisseurs, galleries and collectors in mind. Please enjoy!

Recent editions
Have a look here! Perhaps you need an art piece on your wall, or as a gift?

shoot
Will wing into your mailbox 2 times a month from now on.

Welcome to my studio
Always open for you. We just need to make an appointment first (see below).

A good ‘weekbegin’ to you! And remember that the arts help keep us human…

My best
Jan Oberg

It’s a photolution…

No other art form is going through so big and fast changes as is photography. We are witnesses to a photographic revolution, a “photolution”.

 

What is it?

It has many element coming together in synergy. Here are some:

• The smartphones, their ever smaller and lighter equipment with ever more imprssive camera performance. It belongs to the past that, say, iPhone photos had to be low quality. True you can’t do with them what you can with a ‘real’ camera, a digital SLR, but you get super quality pictures with which you can do other things such as using:

Apps small and cheap tools helping you to do hitherto unimaginable things when taking and processing a shot. That you can’t do – yet – with a digital SLR, although I guess we shall soon get apps for them too – like you can now get extensions and accessories including lenses for the iPhone that make it come even closer to the DSLR.

• We can carry them with us permanently – “the best camera is the one you carry with you” and not the one you left at home, too bulky, heavy, expensive and thus risky to take along.

But of course the smartphone revolution is only one sub-revolution of the larger photolusion. Whether you use this or that type of digital camera, you become part of the very dynamic changes caused by:

Digitalisation – the end of expensive films and darkroom processing. Digital formats are free and can be processed in millions of ways – even to the point where the original shot is hard to identify.

Photoshopping – the immense possibilities embedded in that super complex software that makes your old darkroom look like a thing of the stone-age. While you can’t make a bad image better in Photoshop you can certain make a good one better – or turn it into something completely different such as a piece of abstract art, but still photography- based.

We increasingly live in an age of images and communicate through images. still or video. It is very true that one image can say more than a thousand words – not because texts are not important or effective as means of communication or because they can not give more vivid information and details but because people, grosso modo and sadly so – don’t seem to think that they have the time to read but do take time to see.

The latter is often quite superficial, however, as any gallery owner or museum guard will tell you. Research done at art museums reveals that the average time people spend in front of an art work is 15-30 seconds.

Social media and globalisation and Continue reading