Monthly Archives: May 2017

Making it to the Venice Biennale. Or, almost so…

In late autumn 2016 I was approached by the Dutch Global Art Affairs – GAA – Foundation about which you may read here.

Large art and architecture exhibitions are organised every year during the Venice Biennale period hosted and supported by the European Cultural Centre.

Like numerous other exhibitions all over Venice in that period, the GAA exhibitions are listed as part of the Biennale program.

As you’ll see here, their exhibitions can be found in two palaces – Mora and Bembo in the heart of Venice.

It goes without saying that I was very excited about this contact. It wasn’t an invitation per se but we had a long exploratory Skype talk and the GAA people were planning to integrate photography more than before in their exhibitions, they evidently thought my globally-oriented – photography was relevant and took serious interest in the fact that I was also a peace and conflict researcher with pictures from places like Burundi, Iran and Syria.

We discussed various more or less lofty ideas and recognised that time was actually quite short for me to come up with something original, produce it and mount it all in frames and transport it to Venice for the 13th of May opening.

Mora.jpg

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A French blog about Oberg’s art photography

One day in 2016 a French 22-year old student of international management, finance and sustainability wrote to me and explained that, as part of her studies as an exchange student at our local Lund University, she was obliged to create a blog on a theme quite apart from the core of her studies.

What a brilliant idea it was! She should, as part of her French university requirement, create a blog about a local artist and, thereby, get some insights into a world different from international economics.

I was reminded that about 30 years ago when I was the head of the university’s peace research institute there was something called ‘core curriculum,’ a kind of civic, cultural and philosophical intro to the later academic studies.

Those were the days! – when students did not study to just get an exam and a job in the ‘marketplace’ but received a general, diverse education for life.

ED

Héloïse Dumont

Héloïse Dumont came around my studio and presented her task – and would I please be her ‘object’. I didn’t hesitate. She had a keen interest in art herself and the way she presented her blog idea were pleasantly challenging for me too.
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