Shoot # 54

TateBrit

Lund, August 3, 2016
Click on images for info, link or prices 

Content  

• Tate Britain (Painting With Light and Tracey Emin) • Tate Modern • Iran • Fotografiska in Stockholm • Abstract Real Show • Global Art Magazine • Instagram • Montenegro and more from:

Jan Oberg – Oberg PhotoGraphics

Dear friend

Welcome to shoot # 54 

Art exhibitions are a kind of performances: How do we relate to the works we see and how do we ‘perform’ in the rooms? The above photo was shot in London in May at Tate Britain.

It’s not just documentary; it’s has a particular colour atmosphere; the bodies relate to each other, there’s a head under the arm, people move in and out of the ‘stage’.

It’s a digital gift and will appear only here and on my blog,a moment of joy or reflection from Oberg PhotoGraphics.

A special welcome to many new subscribers and social media friends. Here is the preceding shoot. 

shoot aims to stimulate art curiosity and only secondly to tell what I do. It wings into your mailbox now and then, and sometimes I may shoot just a single image your way.

shoot also leads you to the online GlobalArt Magazine that I curate. Click: Inspiration is guaranteed. It’s sharing of art for cultural bridge-building and civilisation, the opposite of war and other destruction.

I write as an art recommender, not art critic. What’s the use of telling you what I find boring, bad or bull? But I sometimes deviate a bit: below I write about Tracey Emin’s exceptionally boring bed.

I believe in networking, sharing and creating positive energy. Share with me if you have news and views.

Iran
When you receive this, I’ll be in Iran – to do some interviews, give a lecture, dialogue for understanding and peace. And of course to take photos – perhaps a photo book in the future? There is a small collection of my Iran photos here. It’s an amazing civilization of its own, the people truly welcoming. I believe that going to places and see for yourself contributes to peace.

Fotografiska in Stockholm
Fotografiska is one of the leading meeting places for everything photography in the world. I write about the place and some of this summer’s many exhibitions – by Nick Brandt, Bryan Adams and others – here.

Tate Britain and Tate Modern
My first time to see the new ‘old’ Tate building. The “Painting With Light” exhibition was a real eye-opener for me. So was the collection and the dance performances – beautiful, silent and surprising (see the link). Tracey Emin’s bed has re-appeared and she thinks it is a part of history. I don’t. I found it boring, a sign of the navel-gazing, atomistic times in which we live, or perhaps die.


A glimpse of Tate Britain’s unique interior

The new Tate Modern extension hadn’t been opened yet. But what a collection! A wonderful exhibition of “Performing For The Camera”, and a fine juxtaposition of Mark Rothko and Claude Monet and much more more. Positive notes and impressions here.


Mark Rothko and meditating viewer at Tate Modern

Montenegro
Recently hiked in Montenegro’s wild nature with its majestic mountains and magic lakes. Here a few shots – nature photography as well as Gerhard Richter-inspired ‘blurred’ images that I call contours.


“Montenegrin Contour # 2 © Jan Oberg 2016. Click it.

Instagram
I like Instagram, @obergphotographics, and its responsiveness. I upload travel images, experiments and some of my works there. Almost every day. Let’s follow each other! 

Exhibition “Abstract Real” still on
Visitors tell me that my studio is more like a home than a cool, commercial gallery. You can watch photos and browse books as well as discuss art and global affairs with me. It’s by appointment only and then I am present to care for each visitor.

Non-figurative photography? Some words about it on Oberg PhotoGraphics BlogHave a sneak peek here of some of the works that are on show.

Always welcome – just call first! Perhaps one day you need a gift or want to give your own walls a new life.

Next shoot
Much from Iran and some shots I haphazardly did of objects at the Victoria and Albert Museum’s collections like this:


Jesus at Victoria & Albert Museum © Jan Oberg 2016

– and perhaps some late reflections on SCOPE, Liste and Art Basel.

Remember
– that it’s the arts more than anything that keep us human…

My best
Jan Oberg

Fotografiska in Stockholm

Fotografiska in Stockholm is one of the largest meeting places in the world for photography with about 500,000 visitors per year.

IMG_5778.jpg

Stockholm floats on islands, not without similarities with Venice, but in contrast to Venice it has cars, too many cars, and the modernism and futurism of the 1960s destroyed a series of quarters in the city centre.

Fortunately Fotografiska is beautifully situated across the water from the Skeppsholmen island of the old town that is host to a lot of educational and historical building as well as museums, including the famous Moderna Museet.

Fotografiska – The Photographic – is a number of simultaneous exhibitions and a magazine, café, restaurant (good!), bookstore (fine diverse selection), courses, lectures and workshops.

IMG_5843.jpg

IMG_5793.jpg

And the opening hours are interesting, at least when I was there in July 2016: Sunday to Wednesday 9-23, Thursday-Saturday 9-01. How wonderful to go there in the late summer evening!

IMG_5776.jpg

It will take you 30-40 minutes to walk from the Central Station to Fotografiska, and it is a breathtakingly beautiful stretch through old lanes, past the Parliament and Foreign Ministry etc. And then no less fascinating when in the late evening, or night, you walk back again. Try it!

IMG_5845.jpg
Here is what one could see in late July: An exhibition of Nick Brandt, “Inherit The Dust”, “The Image Of Greta Garbo”, Bryan Adams’ “Exposed” and a selection from his “Wounded. The Legacy Of War” project; Hanna Modigh “Hurrican Seasons”, Aapo Huhta’s work as young Nordic prize winner and Åke Ericsson’s “Non Grata” about Roma people in Europe. I focus in the following on the first-mentioned four.

It will take you several hours to visit Fotografiska to do justice to the building, the environment, the bookstore etc – and of course the exhibitions. The rooms in this 1906 Art Nouveau-style customs building that the Stockholm City paid US$ 30 million to renovate – Fotografiska is otherwise a private enterprise – are ideal: Dark, fine spotlightning and excellently informative texts.

Nick Brandt

I’ve seen Brandt’s works before, at Photo London, and wasn’t so taken as many others – except of course for the superb technical quality. But what really was the idea, I wondered?

This time, I tried to understand them better and it helped a lot to watch the movie in which Brandt speaks about his motives and goals and how these pieces were done – and, yes, those inserted pictures are real and not PhotoShopped!

The fact that they are real, huge photo walls placed on location opened up for them to become interactive with the local population.

IMG_5868.jpg

Continue reading

Tate Modern in May 2016

The new Tate Modern building* was inaugurated on June 17. I was there in late May and much still looked like a building site, here the turbine hall:

TateM1
Tate Modern, May 2016 © Jan Oberg

 

The main exhibit at the time was “Performing For The Camera”; curator Simon Baker talks here about it (it ended in June). It’s about how we all act – more than ever today – in front of a camera, act differently from how we would otherwise have because there is a camera.

The exhibition is very well curated, the display logic and pedagogical – covering documenting events, performances staged to be photographed, photos of actions and creative work, self-performance and selfies à la Cindy Sherman, public relations, self-portraits and performing real life – as did Amalia Ulman on Instagram.

It raises the question – why do we begin to act when a camera is around? How has the camera been serving throughout modern times as a tool to document or create art works, performances in particular.

There is an excellent review in The Guardian by a critic, Adrian Searle, who is actually participating in one of the exhibited works in which he is watching a female artist undress.

Apart from insights into the history of art – through e.g. Yves Klein, Beuys, Keith Haring – and their relations to photography, this excellent exhibition kind-of tells you what lead us up to today’s fascination with the mobile, lightweight cameras: If it is there – and it always is today with almost everyone – let’s use it for something, be it documentary, selfies, experimenting and showing others not only what we do but also who we are.

The idea and quality of sharing hasn’t changed. The quantity in which we do indeed has.

Since you were not allowed to take photos – what a pity!! – here are lots of images from Google. I still wonder why the (paying) visitor cannot take pictures when every work is already on the Internet?

Finally, about this exhibition. It wasn’t the first time I encountered the black-and-white photographic works by Francesca Woodman – as remarkable as enigmatic self-portraits, staged but nothing of the snapshot selfie-type of today.

But it was the first time I found out that she did only a few hundred photos and then committed suicide in 1981 at the age of only 22. Continue reading

Tate Britain And Tracey Emin’s Boring Bed

I’d never go to London without visiting Tate Britain or Modern or both. Always something worth seeing. The main exhibit in May 2016 was “Painting With Light” which I have written a short info about here.

Then I explored a bit the new (2013) major renovation, after having been confused by the (upon thinking a bit, obvious) fact that the visitor has to go down to underground to access the new halls. It’s a very beautiful descent…

IMG_3942

 

IMG_4042

To one’s surprise, in the middle of the huge hall there appear silent dancers moving in and around visitors. It is Pablo Bronstein’s “Historical Dances In An Antique Setting” – here in a long exposure photo and in that antique setting: Continue reading

Shoot # 53

frozenyughurt1_1200

Lund, June 13, 2016
Click on images for info, link or prices 

Content  

• Photo London • OXO Fix London • Photographers’ Gallery • Tate Britain • Art Basel • SCOPE • Photo Basel
• Abstract Real Show • Global Art Magazine • Montenegro and more from:

Jan Oberg – Oberg PhotoGraphics

Dear Art Photo friend

Welcome to – improved – shoot # 53 

The above photo was shot in London in May when it turned into the international centre of photography. It’s a digital gift and will appear only here – a moment of joy sent to you from Oberg PhotoGraphics.

If you are a gallery or photographer chances are that you are mentioned in one of the articles below.

A special welcome to many new subscribers and friends on social media. Here is the preceding shoot and you’ll see that it changes a bit with this issue: Content first; more photos many of which only here and not on homepage – thus, special for you, my subscribers.

Finally, shoot will become less regular and – another new idea – sometimes I may shoot a single image your way.

shoot also leads you to the online GlobalArt Magazine that I curate. Click, inspiration guaranteed. It’s sharing of art for cultural bridgebuilding and civilisation – the opposite of war and other destruction. And it’s news from Oberg PhotoGraphics Blog. Tell a friend, send a mail. shoot is free of course!

Networking, sharing and creating positive energy is what I believe in.

I am not an art critic, I’m an art recommender. I write only positive notes, or “recommendations”. What’s the use of telling you what I find boring, bad or bull?

London
Photo London: 84 leading photo galleries exhibiting their best. Here my Photo London: Positive Notes with quite a few of my images from the fair and short texts. And here some out-of-focus shots from Somerset House. Every art event can be seen as a piece of art!


“Untitled – London in May” © Jan Oberg 2016.

On Oberg PhotoGraphics Blog some positive notes about FIX Photo at Bargehouse, OXO Wharf and here about The Photographers’ Gallery with Deutsche Börse Prize shortlisted photographers.
On June 10, Trevor Paglen was announced as this year’s winner. All four shortlisted could have won – brilliant as they were. And a recommendation of “Painting With Light” at Tate Britain.

Montenegro
Recently hiked in Montenegro’s wild nature with its majestic mountains and magic lakes. Here a few shots – nature photography as well as Gerhard Richter-inspired ‘blurred’ images that I call contours.


“Montenegrin Contour # 7 © Jan Oberg 2016. Click it.

Exhibition “Abstract Real” still on
Visitors tell me that my studio is more like a home than a cool, commercial gallery. You can watch photos and browse books as well as discuss art and global affairs with me. It’s by appointment only and then I am present to care for each visitor.

Non-figurative photography? Some words about it on Oberg PhotoGraphics Blog.
Have a sneak peek here of some of the works that are on show.

Always welcome – just call first! Perhaps one day you need a gift or want to give your own walls a new life.


Crosshatch Series 4-5 © Jan Oberg 2011. Click it

Next shoot
Positive notes to come on Tate Modern with Performing for the Camera and the fine “pairing” exhibits of, say, Monet+Richter and Rothko+Monet there. And about some shots I haphazardly did of objects at the Victoria and Albert Museum’s collections like this:


Jesus at Victoria & Albert Museum © Jan Oberg 2016

I’ll also return to some very interesting works at Tate Britain and other stuff there – except Tracy Emin’s The Bed!

Next Stop: Basel!
This week off to BaselArt Basel, the world’s largest (and most commercial?) contemporary art fair. See a brand new video here. But equally important all the other significant – less posh and more experimenting – events that takes place in amazing Basel such as SCOPE and Photo Basel (2nd year only). Will write about and upload to Instagram, @obergphotographics. 

Remember
– that it’s the arts more than anything that keep us human…

My best
Jan Oberg

“Painting With Light” at Tate Britain

The whole long title of this exhibition is “Painting With Light – Art and Photography from the Pre-Raphaelites to the Modern Age”. Since I believe that photography is an art – like painting or sculpture or graphic prints – the title may feel somehow a little misguided.

On the famous other hand, the exhibition covers a period of art history during which photography wasn’t broadly considered an art form.

paintingwithlightwebbanner

As a matter of fact the aim is to show the visitor how closely the two have been in certain circles and how they interacted with each other through individual pioneers and small innovative milieus in both fields.

The show counts 90 pairings of paintings and photographs with striking similarities – never before displayed together.

It’s a very very fine educational exhibition that I warmly recommend. Unfortunately, you are not allowed to take pictures there so I can’t show you my impressions. Funnily, however, lots of the works are on Google images

But check things out on the above link as well as Tate’s in-depth info – here with direct comparisons.

Here is a very informative pre-exhibition article in Aesthetica. And here is a, rather critical review in The Telegraph arguing that this exhibition is more like a dry academic textbook than a lively exhibition.

I can’t judge; I just found all the juxtapositions of paintings and photography over 75 years very illuminating of a theme that has only become more and more important ever since and shows how art creators inspire and build on each other across media they choose.

Closes on September 25, 2016.

 

The Photographers’ Gallery and Deutsche Börse Prize

The Photographers’ Gallery in London – a few minutes from Oxford Circus – is a must for the photo enthusiast. It’s the type of institution any city should have in some shape or form as part of its cultural policy. The Photographers’ Gallery could serve as a model or inspiration, I believe, to anyone.

This is how the history of the place is presented on its homepage:

The Photographers’ Gallery was founded in 1971 by Sue Davies OBE in a converted Lyon’s Tea Bar at No. 8 Great Newport Street in London’s Covent Garden.

Free to the public, it was the first gallery in the world to be devoted solely to photography. The aim, born from Davies’ own passion for photography, and frustration that it was denied the consideration and exhibition platform of other visual arts, was to provide a proper home for photographers and their work, as well as establish the medium as a serious art form. Through an illuminating and influential programme of exhibitions, talks and educational activities, the Gallery elevated photography as an artistic and cultural leader whilst promoting its vital role as a social and historical document.

1971…the first gallery in the world devoted solely! Oh, how late in the history of art – and Oh, how fast things have changed!

Here is everything you may want to know before visiting this place which has changing exhibitions, library and education, print and book sales, online bookstore, lecture and meeting facilities, cafeteria and more – and still it is not big. You can see everything in an hour or two.

IMG_3104

The main show when I visited was of the four shortlisted candidates for the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2016: Laura El-Tantawy, Erik Kessels, Tobias Zielony and Trevor Paglen.

It was announced on June 10 that Paglen was the winner. Continue reading